Wildflowers

Meadow wildflowers

This was actually supposed to be yesterday’s Sunday Snapshots, but I’ve been without internet for the last couple of days. I’m housesitting for my parents while they’re away touring the Gaspé Peninsula of Quebec. The internet was acting up on me when I arrived, and then it quit altogether. I finally left the modem and router unplugged for the night. This morning they seem to be functional again. The up-side to being without a connection for a while is that one tends to find one’s productivity greatly increases without the distraction… I made some good progress with the moth guide, and that’s a good thing.

Dan actually called yesterday to make sure I was alright as he hadn’t heard from me, and I hadn’t posted to the blog – which seemed a funny point to notice, but then, I do try to keep it regularly updated. Providing the connection here continues to cooperate (knock on wood) I should be back to normal.

Meadow wildflowers

The photos today are from the meadows that make up about a quarter of my parents’ 65-acre property. It might be the loveliest summer wildflower display I’ve seen. Certainly our own fields at Tay Meadows are only intermittently scattered with flowers; most fields I see are mostly grass. I attribute the profusion of flowers here to the fact that the area was grazed over by horses for a while, before my parents bought the place. The horses would have eaten the grasses but largely ignored the wildflower vegetation, which allowed the flowers to get a strong foothold in the soil – one of the reasons that artificial wildflower gardens often fail is that the grass, which is a stronger competitor, moves in before the wildflowers can become fully established. Whatever the reason it’s there, it makes for quite a lovely scene.

Meadow wildflowers

I didn’t actually pause to identify all the species of flower present in the meadow while I was out there – we’ve had so much rain here this spring that the swamps and vernal pools that are normally nearly dry by July are still quite full of water, and have been breeding mosquitoes like mad. I didn’t put any bug spray on as I quite dislike the stuff and only use it if I anticipate having to pause in one spot for long periods (for instance, when we’re out doing MAPS I have to apply it, though I’m careful to cleanse my hands afterward).

From the photo, though, I can spot the following species: Black-eyed Susan, Ox-eyed Daisy, Cow Vetch, Red Clover, Alsike Clover, Yellow Hop Clover, Philadelphia Fleabane, and St-John’s Wort. And although I don’t think any made it into the photos, there’s also Bird’s-foot Trefoil, Swamp Vervain, and Common Yarrow, that I noticed out there.

Meadow wildflowers

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4 responses to “Wildflowers

  1. Wildflowers by Bob Etier

    The last farmer here grew tomatoes

    In a field—full of sun—near a stream.

    We turned the field over to flowers

    We’ve planted a water-colored dream.

    Sometimes young girls pass by our homestead

    And ask, “Can we pick just a few?”

    “Why not?” we say, handing them clippers,

    “We grew them out there just for you.”

    Just thought this poem was fitting for your nice post — barbara

  2. A number of these are on the go over our back fence, plus masses of tiny white stars — a type of cerastium (chickweed)?
    Vetch is a real nuisance in gardens around here, but it sure looks pretty in your photos!

  3. Nice prairie pics. The prairies here in Wisconsin are beautiful as well. Your parents are quite lucky to have such a lovely display so near.

  4. Wonderful! The way meadows once were…it’s nice to see that some remain. What interests me in the photos and your description is the rich diversity in such a relatively small area, a tangled bank of species no doubt supporting a wide range of insects and butterflies. Excellent blog; I’m glad to have found it!
    Cheers,
    Julian

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